An extended warranty is essentially a contract that covers repairs or replacement parts for your car. There are two main types of extended warranty - full coverage and non-cooperative. Full coverage extended auto warranties promise to repair or replace your car at the manufacturer’s shop at no cost to you if there’s ever an issue with your vehicle. A non-cooperative warranty, meanwhile, requires that you bring your car to the dealership for repairs rather than having the manufacturer take care of the problem directly. Which type of warranty is best for you? Depending on your situation, one type may be better than the other. Here’s an overview of each type to help you decide which extended car warranty is right for you. Keep reading for details on the pros and cons of each so you can make an informed decision about which one is best for your needs.

Full Coverage Extended Warranty

Full coverage extended car warranties promise to repair or replace your car at the manufacturer’s shop at no cost to you if there’s ever an issue with your vehicle. This means that if your car breaks down and needs to be fixed, you won’t have to pay anything beyond the initial deductible. If your car’s transmission blows out, for example, a full coverage extended warranty may cover the costs of replacing it.Full coverage extended car warranties can also help you with other unexpected expenses. If you need to get your car repaired and have to take time off from work, a full coverage extended warranty can help you with the costs of getting those repairs done.

Non-Cooperative Extended Warranty

A non-cooperative extended warranty, on the other hand, requires that you bring your car to the dealership for repairs rather than having the manufacturer take care of the problem directly. This means that if your car breaks down and needs to be fixed, you’ll have to pay for the repairs out-of-pocket and may have to find another mechanic to perform the work.A non-cooperative extended warranty may also have additional requirements. You may have to get your car to a designated dealership at specific times during the year. You may also be required to get your car inspected regularly by a mechanic to ensure that it’s up to snuff.Non-cooperative extended warranties are often cheaper than full coverage extended car warranties. However, you may have to pay for travel and other extra expenses to get your car to the dealership. Some non-cooperative extended warranties require that you carry a certain amount of liability insurance to cover the costs of getting your car to the dealership.

Which extended warranty is right for you?

The type of extended warranty that’s right for you depends on your situation. If you’re worried about having enough money on hand to cover unexpected car repairs, a non-cooperative extended warranty may be for you.If you have a history of having to pay for car repairs out-of-pocket, a full coverage extended warranty may be a better option.If you’re concerned about getting to the dealership in a timely manner, a non-cooperative extended warranty may be the better choice.If you’re concerned about getting your car inspected, a non-cooperative extended warranty may be a good choice.If you want to save money on insurance and don’t mind having to travel to the dealership, a non-cooperative extended warranty may be for you.

Drawbacks to Full Coverage Extended Warranties

Full coverage extended car warranties can be pricey. If you’re currently shopping for a new car, you may want to hold off on purchasing a full coverage extended warranty. You’ll need to factor in the cost of the warranty when calculating your monthly payment.Additionally, you’ll want to make sure that the warranty is in place when you take delivery of your new car. Otherwise, you’ll have to start over with a new warranty.

Drawbacks to Non-Cooperative Extended Warranties

The biggest drawback of a non-cooperative extended warranty is that you’ll have to pay for any auto repairs out-of-pocket. You’ll have to pay for the parts themselves, as well as any labor costs incurred while getting your car fixed.In some cases, you may be responsible for paying travel expenses to get your car to the dealership. You’ll also be responsible for any wear-and-tear on your car as a result of getting it fixed.In addition to being responsible for all costs, you’ll also have to find a mechanic to fix your car. You may be able to find a reputable mechanic in your area who’s willing to work on your car for free. If not, you’ll have to pay to get the job done.

Bottom line

There are a couple of things to keep in mind when deciding which type of extended warranty is right for you. First, you’ll want to make sure that the warranty is in place when you take delivery of your new car. Otherwise, you’ll have to start over with a new warranty.Second, you’ll want to make sure that the warranty covers all of your bases. If you have a history of having to pay for car repairs out-of-pocket, a full coverage extended warranty may be a better option.If you have a hard time budgeting for unexpected expenses, a non-cooperative extended warranty may be for you.If you want to save money on insurance and don’t mind having to travel to the dealership, a non-cooperative extended warranty may be for you.